Season greetings

Season greetings

We wish lagos and fellows of the city great time of the season and eventful new year coming . Happy new year

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Smart New Lagos and New visions

Smart New Lagos and New visions

New thought innovative approaches which evolves through consultation procedures for urban design is introducing new concepts and fresh background consideration as the city of lagos is increasingly a pluricultural space of variable geometry. The harmony is the pursuit of lagos urban future. Hence

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Urban Environmental Challenge.........

Urban Environmental Challenge………

Urban Environmental Challenge......... The role of urban communities in global sustainable development and in the improvement of local health conditions has already been recognized by the Rio Conference on Environment and Development in 1992. The conference under- lined the key roles of human

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Urban lagos design, development and management ! pollution Overview

The introduction of Global environmental standards for air pollution local authorities are facing the challenge of being responsible for effective counter measures if limit values of air pollution are exceeded. The public is put into the position to request from the local authorities to ensure suffi

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URBAN LAGOS and The Building of an Efficient City THE BooK........................................URBAN LAGOS and The Building of an Efficient City, reviewing Global best practice point of views............................  CPTED Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) is a design methodology that focuses on reducing opportunities for crime and mitigating fear of crime to improve quality of life factors. Through the design and management of the physical environment and an increase in public safety and education, CPTED programs have increased community security. Four basic principles of CPTED that should be considered during site planning and design of public spaces include:  Natural Surveillance Arrange physical features, activities and people in such a way as to maximize visibility. A potential criminal is less likely to attempt a crime if he or she is at risk of being observed. At the same time, we are likely to feel safer when we can see others and be seen.   “Most people want to play a part in making better places but they need to be shown that it is achievable and how they can play a role.” Delivering Quality Places,  Urban Design Compendium 2  “Each material has its specific characteristics which we must understand if we want to use it...” - Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Inaugural address, Illinois Institute of Technology, 1938  “Urbanism works when it creates a journey as desirable as the destination.” Paul Goldberger, Architecture Critic, New Yorker  “Architects have been eagerly re-inventing the station as a green “multimodal” hub – incorporating buses, trams, and taxis – at the heart of city life.” William Underhill, “Station Design: Waiting for the Train”, Newsweek, Dec.3, 2009  “The future is about green developement, infill, and TOD.” Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2010  “The station becomes like a business card for the city.” Andreas Heym, chief architect responsible for more than 100 new stations worldwide  “... relate the building to the city” Santiago Calatrava, Architect  Great places are defined in large part by great streets. Jane Jacobs said it well: “Streets and their sidewalks, the main public places of a city, are its most vital organs  Allan Jacobs, in his book “Great Streets”, defined a number of criteria representative of streets that go beyond simply moving cars: a symbol of community history; physically comfortable and safe; encouraging participation and entertainment; open access to all; attractive and remembered  Increased density demands wider sidewalks. Sidewalks should provide ample zones for walking, street furniture and storefront activities such as cafes, merchandise displays and window shopping. Typical minimum urban sidewalk widths (from curb to edge of sidewalk) are: 10-12 feet for residential neighborhoods; 14-18 feet for mixed-use main streets; and 16-24 feet for high density urban centers.  Open Space and Public Realm.  Creating a station where people want to be will depend in part on the quality of the public spaces where people relax and interact. These public spaces become increasingly important as the density of the station area becomes greater.  More than half of the world’s population now lives in urban areas for the first time in history. By 2050 more than 80 percent will. Making use of this fact ensure  the the future increase in urban population and I can't see any articulated development strategic plan for the LAGOS of the FUTURE.

URBAN LAGOS and The Building of an Efficient City THE BooK………………………………….URBAN LAGOS and The Building of an Efficient City, reviewing Global best practice point of views………………………. CPTED Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) is a design methodology that focuses on reducing opportunities for crime and mitigating fear of crime to improve quality of life factors. Through the design and management of the physical environment and an increase in public safety and education, CPTED programs have increased community security. Four basic principles of CPTED that should be considered during site planning and design of public spaces include: Natural Surveillance Arrange physical features, activities and people in such a way as to maximize visibility. A potential criminal is less likely to attempt a crime if he or she is at risk of being observed. At the same time, we are likely to feel safer when we can see others and be seen. “Most people want to play a part in making better places but they need to be shown that it is achievable and how they can play a role.” Delivering Quality Places, Urban Design Compendium 2 “Each material has its specific characteristics which we must understand if we want to use it…” – Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Inaugural address, Illinois Institute of Technology, 1938 “Urbanism works when it creates a journey as desirable as the destination.” Paul Goldberger, Architecture Critic, New Yorker “Architects have been eagerly re-inventing the station as a green “multimodal” hub – incorporating buses, trams, and taxis – at the heart of city life.” William Underhill, “Station Design: Waiting for the Train”, Newsweek, Dec.3, 2009 “The future is about green developement, infill, and TOD.” Emerging Trends in Real Estate 2010 “The station becomes like a business card for the city.” Andreas Heym, chief architect responsible for more than 100 new stations worldwide “… relate the building to the city” Santiago Calatrava, Architect Great places are defined in large part by great streets. Jane Jacobs said it well: “Streets and their sidewalks, the main public places of a city, are its most vital organs Allan Jacobs, in his book “Great Streets”, defined a number of criteria representative of streets that go beyond simply moving cars: a symbol of community history; physically comfortable and safe; encouraging participation and entertainment; open access to all; attractive and remembered Increased density demands wider sidewalks. Sidewalks should provide ample zones for walking, street furniture and storefront activities such as cafes, merchandise displays and window shopping. Typical minimum urban sidewalk widths (from curb to edge of sidewalk) are: 10-12 feet for residential neighborhoods; 14-18 feet for mixed-use main streets; and 16-24 feet for high density urban centers. Open Space and Public Realm. Creating a station where people want to be will depend in part on the quality of the public spaces where people relax and interact. These public spaces become increasingly important as the density of the station area becomes greater. More than half of the world’s population now lives in urban areas for the first time in history. By 2050 more than 80 percent will. Making use of this fact ensure the the future increase in urban population and I can’t see any articulated development strategic plan for the LAGOS of the FUTURE.

  THE BooK........................................URBAN LAGOS and The Building of an Efficient City, reviewing Global best practice point of views............................   CPTED Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) is a design methodology that focuses on r

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Prioritizing environmental concerns: Generally speaking, it seems clear that without meeting the basic needs of human beings, concern for the environment has to be secondary. Man has to survive, answer, and attend first to his basic survival needs - food, housing, sanitation - and then to the envir

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sustainability acts

sustainability acts

Welcome to our monthly e-bulletin announcing the latest publications from the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED), an independent, non-profit research institute working in the field of sustainable development. http://www.iied.org For review copies please email: newbo

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Urban Land Institute

Urban Land Institute

Denver Site Chosen for 2009 Hines Student Urban Design Competition A 75-acre site south of downtown Denver has been chosen as the development site for the seventh annual Urban Land Institute (ULI) Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition. Through the competition, now underway, interdiscipli

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Planning for Sustainable Urban Environments

Planning for Sustainable Urban Environments

The Ecological Footprint Of Cities And Regions: Comparing Resource Availability with Resource Demand.- Introduction.- Characteristics and Analysis of Urban Sustainable Systems.- Urban Social Sustainability.- C The  ity and Its.- Economy of the City and its Region.- Improving Lives of Slum Dwellers

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City Image

City Image

City branding: an effective assertion of identity or a transitory marketing trick? Introduction ‘City branding: an effective assertion of identity or a transitory marketing trick?’ uses contemporary developments in marketing theory and practice to suggest how product branding can be transfor

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